The Seventh Ward was considered by many to be the quintessential Creole neighborhood in New Orleans. Many educated and accomplished people of color lived here before the Civil War and throughout the time when Jim Crow laws were in effect. But after desegregation, the city built the I-10 interstate right over the Claiborne neutral ground, destroying the 7th Ward’s prosperous business district in the process.

Today the community remembers the beautiful live oaks that were torn down to make way for the interstate by painting images of these trees on the cement pilings that replaced them.

Among the first owners was Claude Dubreuil whose vast estate stretched from the river to Bayou Sauvage and Gentilly. By the late 1700s, this land had changed proprietorship several times and finally came into the holdings of Bernard Marigny, who successfully subdivided the Faubourg Marigny and continued with what was called Nouveau Marigny (between Elysian Fields and St. Bernard and from St. Claude to Gentilly Rd.). When, in 1830, the Pontchartrain Railroad connected the Faubourg Marigny with the settlement of Milneburg on the lake, these lots became more saleable. The railroad helped Nouveau Marigny to grow almost to Gentilly Ridge.

Nearby parks include Congo Square, Bolivar Place and Washington Square.

Nearby schools include Joseph S. Clark Senior High School, McDonogh #15: A Kipp Transformation School and McDonogh #35 Senior High School.

The closest grocery stores are Rampart Food Store, Quarter Grocery and Busy Bee Food Store.

Nearby coffee shops include Pagoda Café, Who Dat Coffee Cafe and The Old Coffee Pot Restaurant. There are 21 restaurants within a 15 minute walk including Today Cajun Seafood, Cajun Seafood and Danny’s Seafood.

Near Dillard University, Entergy Headquarters and Xavier University of Louisiana.

Neighborhood information and description provided via GNODC and Walkscore

Seventh Ward

>   About the Area   <

IMPORTANT BUILDINGS

TIMELINE

ANNUAL EVENTS

Algiers Point

Algiers Point

It’s a short ferry ride from the foot of Canal Street in busy downtown New Orleans to Algiers Point, but the transition is dramatic. Algiers Point is New Orleans’ Brooklyn without… read more

Broadmoor

Broadmoor

An architecturally, economically and racially diverse neighborhood, Broadmoor is situated in the heart of the city. Although largely a 20th-century neighborhood, it began to be developed in the early 1880s on… read more

Bywater
The beautiful grounds of the Country Club (Photo: facebook.com/thecountryclubneworleans)

Bywater

Bywater is a neighborhood of the city of New Orleans. A subdistrict of the Bywater District Area, its boundaries as defined by the City Planning Commission are: Florida Avenue to the… read more

Carrollton

Carrollton

Perhaps it’s the tree-shaded streets and spacious houses that make Carrollton feel nostalgic, or perhaps it is the influence of Tulane and Loyola universities, whose many students, faculty and alumni make… read more

Central Business District

Central Business District

Like so many American urban centers, New Orleans’ Central Business District used to be a ghost town after work, but not anymore. Evenings now bring crowds to historic Lafayette Square for… read more

Central City

Central City

Orleanians from all across town converge on Uglesich’s in Central City for a lunchtime po-boy sandwich and some people watching. Nearby Café Reconcile draws lawyers, artists, activists and teachers, attracted by… read more

Esplanade Ridge

Esplanade Ridge

The grand address of the Creole upper class in the 19th century, Esplanade Avenue is a living gallery of 19th and early 20th century residential architecture. The oak-lined boulevard and surrounding… read more

Faubourg Marigny

Faubourg Marigny

People in Faubourg Marigny are passionate about preservation. They saw their downtown neighborhood, developed as New Orleans’ second suburb in 1806, abandoned by city officials and desecrated by “modern” zoning regulations… read more

Garden District

Garden District

The Classic Revival mansions and charming cottages of the Garden District are famous around the world, thanks to picture books and well-organized tours. What visitors rarely see, though, is the close-knit… read more

Gentilly Terrace

Gentilly Terrace

Gentilly Terrace was the second of New Orleans’ 20th-century neighborhoods to be named to the National Register of Historic Places. Developers Michael Baccich, Edward E. Lafaye and R. E. Edgar deMontluzin,… read more

Holy Cross

Holy Cross

The Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, or Industrial Canal, is a narrow boundary, but it effectively separates urban Bywater from the relatively rural and settled Holy Cross Historic District. The cottages tucked… read more

Irish Channel

Irish Channel

The Irish Channel has experienced an exciting growth spurt. The blighted houses that filled the district in the early 1990s are finding new buyers who often renovate them for their own… read more

Lakeview

Lakeview

A neighborhood of the city of New Orleans. A subdistrict of the Lakeview District Area, its boundaries as defined by the City Planning Commission are: Robert E. Lee Boulevard to the… read more

Lower Garden District

Lower Garden District

Stroll under the oaks of Coliseum Square or any of the smaller parks in the Lower Garden District and you’re likely to find locals playing with their dogs or reading on… read more

Mid City

Mid-City is the heart of New Orleans, the area where locals come when they want to remember what makes this city the generous, pleasure-loving, hard-boiled town that it is. Stop by… read more

New Marigny

New Marigny

Convenient to both New Orleans’ Central Business District and the Vieux Carré, historic New Marigny, also called Faubourg St. Roch, has all the makings of a desirable downtown neighborhood. Industrialization and… read more

Parkview

Parkview

Each year the annual Endymion parade brings extended families onto the lawns of Parkview for an exuberant, weekend-long Mardi Gras picnic. A few weeks later Mardi Gras Indians from around New… read more

St. Roch

St. Roch

St. Roch is a neighborhood of the U.S. city of New Orleans. A subdistrict of the Bywater District Area, its boundaries as defined by the City Planning Commission are: Lafreniere Street,… read more

South Lakeview

South Lakeview

Entering the neighborhood of South Lakeview is like taking a trip back in time to an era when families lived in the same home for generations and those homes were built… read more

Treme

Treme

Treme retains the feel of an old Creole New Orleans neighborhood. Second line parades and jazz funerals are still common, while several neighborhood bars are gathering places for musicians. Its architectural… read more

Uptown

Uptown

To the typical Uptowner, New Orleans was Uptown,” writes author Margaret LeCorgne. The Uptown National Register Historic District, beginning upriver of the Garden District and stretching to Broadway, is a self-contained… read more

Vieux Carré

Vieux Carré

Today’s Vieux Carré, also known as the French Quarter, is home to more than 4,000 residents, many of whom walk to work in the neighborhood or in the nearby Central Business… read more

West End

West End

West End (also referred to as West Lakeview) is a neighborhood of the city of New Orleans. A subdistrict of the Lakeview District Area, its boundaries as defined by the City… read more